Redstone Castle, Redstone

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REDSTONE CASTLE

58 Redstone Castle Lane, Redstone, Colorado 81623
info@theredstonecastle.com   970.963.9656

“This turn-of-the-century jewel was completed in 1902 for industrialist and coal magnate John Cleveland Osgood. At the time, Osgood was one of the wealthiest people in the United States (purportedly ranking 6th), and rubbed elbows with the rich and powerful. John D. Rockefeller, J. Pierpont Morgan and Teddy Roosevelt all spent time at the estate. It is also known as Osgood Castle and Cleveholm Manor, its original name.”

Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, the Castle provides a unique glimpse into the personal styles and social culture of America’s elite at the turn of the 20th Century. Built in the Tudor style, the Castle is filled with the finest furnishings of the period: wooden paneling designed by Gustav Stickley, intricately cast brass globe lights created by Louis Tiffany and countless pieces of furniture and artwork collected by the Osgoods on their frequent trips to Europe.”

“In 1899, 42-year-old John Cleveland Osgood was known as the Fuel King of the West, having built his fortune in coal and iron. The mansion was named Cleveholm Manor, using his nickname, Cleve, and holm meaning “alongside a river”The Castle was built as a hunting retreat, and constructed of large stone blocks hand-cut and quarried from the nearby sandstone cliffs.

No expense was spared as the finest craftsmen of the era built the towering mansion on a sloping hillside in the Crystal River valley.”

“Entering the Castle today is like entering another time. The main residence offers 23,000 sq. ft. of living space, with 66 rooms that range from an English-style Great Hall and a Russian-inspired formal dining room to a delicate Ladies’ Drawing Room decorated in the French style of the era.

The Great Hall boasts a unique feature as well: a special “peeping window” through which the original owner could view her guest’s attire. An estimated 60% of the original furnishings remain at the Castle today.”

“The wood paneling throughout the home was all crafted by Gustav Stickley and includes English oak and Honduran mahogany.

Louis Comfort Tiffany designed the fixture work including three giant brass globes carved with lion’s faces, pineapples and angels that light up the English Great Hall.”

“At the ground level of the Castle is the gentlemen’s Game Room and Bar featuring the original billiards and card tables. One can imagine the high stakes being gambled upon and the smell of cigar smoke still wafting in the air.”

“The Great Hall has eighteen-foot ceilings and features a sandstone block fireplace carved with the Osgood Coat of Arms and supporting a trophy elk mount. Even today, most of the furnishings are those that Osgood and his Swedish-born wife, Alma Regina Shelgrem, purchased as antiques in Europe while their Castle was being constructed. The Dining Room is an elegant Russian statement from the court of the Czars, with Honduran mahogany paneling hand rubbed to a cherry red finish, topped by ruby red velvet wall cover and an aluminum leaf ceiling.”

“Distinguished guests such as Teddy Roosevelt, J.P. Morgan and Prince Leopold dined here on wild game with the finest silver and china on the table. Done in a Persian motif, the Library overlooks the front grounds and is a reminder of the deluxe railroad cars that the elite traveled in across the U.S. and Europe.

The paneling and bookshelves are Honduran mahogany topped with green leather, gold leaf stamped wall cover. The aluminum leaf ceiling is hand-stenciled around the borders in a peacock design. After dinner, the ladies would have retired to the femininely-decorated French Music Parlor. The room features green silk damask wall covering, a frescoed plaster ceiling and diamond dust mirror above a Carraran Italian marbled fireplace.”

“The upper floors of the Castle include the original bedroom suites used by the Osgoods and their guests, complete with oversized porcelain claw foot tubs and standing sinks.

Each of the bedroom fireplaces is made of unique colored tile or Italian marble. In the secluded north tower is a two-room suite featuring a domed ceiling decorated with birds and flowers.”

SUITES

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“Roosevelt Suite: Teddy Roosevelt slept here during his presidency, enjoying the abundant hunting and fishing. The suite is 913 sq ft, featuring a sitting room with views to the Crystal River. A separate bedroom has one of the colorful fireplaces that Alma was fond of. There is a large private bathroom with an original 1902 claw-foot tub, as well as a newer shower. The suite sleeps two people in one queen-sized bed.

Sunshine Suite: John Osgood built bedrooms for the 16 servants who were necessary to operate a 1902, 23,000 sq ft mansion. This suite was the dining and gathering area for the servants, and includes an attached butler’s quarters. Today it is a large sunny suite overlooking the Crystal River and castle grounds. This room accommodates wheelchair guests, or those who prefer not to use stairs. An ADA bathroom, two fireplaces, separate bedroom and sitting room are part of this generous 632-sq ft suite. The suite sleeps two people in one queen-sized bed. Notes: There is a television in this suite. The fireplaces are non-operational.

Morgan Suite: JP Morgan was a frequent guest to the castle, along with his counterparts J. Gould and the Rockefellers. The Redstone Castle Morgan Suite features two of Alma’s brightly-colored fireplaces within a bedroom, a sitting room and a large bathroom. The Morgan Suite is 533 sq ft with views overlooking the courtyard and the carriage house to the north. The suite sleeps two people in one queen-sized bed. Notes: There are two televisions in this suite. The fireplace is non-operational.

Mr. Osgood’s Study Suite: As the 6th wealthiest man in the country, and as the president of Pueblo’s CF&I, John Osgood and his accountant had a lot of work to do. He may have had a lot of cash on hand also, as a large, walk-in safe was built into this study. This suite features Osgood’s study (sitting room), accountant’s office (bedroom) and a large private bathroom. The original fireplace and an original claw-foot tub are additional features of this 868 sq ft suite on the ground level of the castle. The suite sleeps two people in one king-sized bed.

Aviary Tower Suite: The architects of the castle, Boals and Harnois of Denver, designed a third-story tower-like room they named the Aviary. Original bird and leaf wallpaper covers the domed ceiling of this bright and sunny room. A “dormitory” is attached to the tower room, presumably for the children of guests. Osgood did not have children with any of his three wives. The suite is 502 sq ft and sleeps two people in one queen-sized bed. Notes: There is not a television or fireplace in this suite. A number of stairs are required to access the suite.

Watchman Suite: Alongside the castle courtyard, Mr. Osgood incorporated a room for his watchman and second room for the valet. The room is strategically located to view the comings and goings of guests and servants to the castle. The suite now features a sitting room, a separate bedroom, and a bathroom within 402 sq ft. The suite sleeps two people in one full-sized bed. Notes: There is no television or fireplace this suite.

Octagon Suite: Originally built as lodging for bachelor staff, the main room of this suite was built with 8 sides. Five narrow windows provided views of the castle lawn for security, while preventing break-ins. A separate bedroom and private bathroom complete this ground-floor suite near the billiard room. The suite sleeps two people in one queen-sized bed in 602 sq ft. Notes: There is a television in this suite. There is not a fireplace in this suite. Smoking and pets are not allowed on the Redstone Castle property.”

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REDSTONE CASTLE

“23,000 sq. ft. of living space, with 66 rooms”

58 Redstone Castle Lane, Redstone, Colorado 81623
info@theredstonecastle.com     970.963.9656

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